Toothy Terrors’ First Night Out

“Stetson!”
I heard crunching and cackles;
“that corpse you planted last year,
has it begun to sprout?”

Of course not, silly ghoul;
only The Sick Rose sprouts.
Corpses always rise at night—
ravenous for mirth.
The mush behind your eyes
should satiate their first night out.  


Note: only a friend, who truly understands my weird, will know to lift my spirits with a toothy pack of grinning Terrors. Thank you, my dear Jonquil; you rocketh very mucho!

Of course… I, too, know how to make my own spirits giggle. So I summoned some creepy yum from Eliot’s “Unreal City” and a pinch of eeriness from “The Sick Rose” by Blake.

for Imaginary Gardens with Real Toads (A little Weird with Mama Zen),
Poets United’s An Evening Out
and Incipient Wings’ Haunted Humpday

Terror, by Aaron Alexovich

65 comments:

  1. That's not weird; that's just the right amount of wicked!

    ReplyDelete
  2. Oooh! Blake! Not Anita, but William! And I'll keep the mush behind my eyes, thank you very much, or there'll be nothing for the worms to eat.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. We wouldn't want those poor worms to starve. No ma'am. That would be too inhuman, wouldn't it? Besides, T.S. and Bill might frown upon such decision. ;-D

      Delete
    2. ....the NASCAR driver?

      Delete
  3. Mush you say?

    I'll have you know, I wouldst be a Zombian delicacy.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hahaha! The things those zombies will learn will probably bring a healthy blush back to their cheeks... if they have any cheeks left. ;-D

      Delete
  4. Delightfully devilish and just a tad weird!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Devilish garnished with a pinch of weird... that works, too. ;-)

      Delete
  5. I do love your wordplay. How it can be subtle like a little jest, or blunt and odd (The good kind of odd, of course) to get a reaction from the reader. As already stated, this is the right kind of weird.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I've always liked "blunt and odd"... very cool. ;-D

      Delete
  6. You do make my little heart thump with dark glee at your wicked words, Lady Magaly! ♥ ;D 'The Sick Rose' is one of my favourite poems (Blake rocks!) too! This is soooooooooooo good I can imagine my beloved Addams clan reciting it at a gathering on All Hallows' Eve! *contended sigh*

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I just imagined Wednesday reciting the poem as Granny grins and cackles... oh joy!

      Delete
  7. I feel right at home with the weirdness, crunching and cackles!

    ReplyDelete
  8. I am still smiling, Magaly. :) Just the right amount of weird. I envy you for having read so much more of Eliot and Blake than I have. I liked your names (your doing or those authors?). Stetson was a big surprise for openers. That put me in a more watchful mode.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. "Stetson" appears in in "Unreal City," my favorite piece of "The Waste Land." Here is the complete excerpt:

      Under the brown fog of a winter dawn,
      A crowd flowed over London Bridge, so many,
      I had not thought death had undone so many.
      Sighs, short and infrequent, were exhaled,
      And each man fixed his eyes before his feet.
      Flowed up the hill and down King William Street,
      To where Saint Mary Woolnoth kept the hours
      With a dead sound on the final stroke of nine.
      There I saw one I knew, and stopped him, crying “Stetson!
      You who were with me in the ships at Mylae!
      That corpse you planted last year in your garden,
      Has it begun to sprout? Will it bloom this year?
      Or has the sudden frost disturbed its bed?
      Oh keep the Dog far hence, that’s friend to men,
      Or with his nails he’ll dig it up again!
      You! hypocrite lecteur!—mon semblable,—mon frère!”

      Isn't it glorious? I swear that one can get lost in this wondrous poem, creating story and worlds out of each line, until reality no longer matter... for as we know, "everything exists in the word."

      One day, I'll spend a couple of years just enjoying "The Waste Land", "Paradise Lost" and all of Blake's work. I seriously have never read a poem by that man that hasn't left me in awe. And the illustrations/illuminations are stunning, too.

      Delete
  9. I love scary weird...Who doesn't like "planting corpses?" :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Indeed! They always promise pretty flowers, don't they?

      Delete
  10. The conversation you portray is totally engaging. Weird? Well, maybe in the general population; but amongst artists and writers you're one of the gang!

    ReplyDelete
  11. Stetson sounds like a homonym of sexton and straight away takes us to this weird land holding the hands of TS and Bill..ha...A d e l i g h t f u l piece Magaly...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I bet you didn't know TS, Bill and I were in such familiar terms, huh? LOL!

      Delete
  12. A fun write Magaly! Brings to mind zombies scanning the earth and their tryouts to put scares into people! Nicely!

    Hank

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. "Zombies Scanning the Earth" sounds like a great title for a story...

      Delete
  13. I have avoided zombie movies like the plague but I accept that many consider them a great night out. This poem, in that context, is unmercifully wicked, mercifully brief, and a unique gem of delight! I do love Goblin Market--a longer one by Edna St. Vincent Millay--and all the horrors of Blake, TS Eliot , Dante, Tolkien, and Shakespeare. Now I get to add you to that list.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I've always been intrigued by the darker aspects of literature (and of life, too).

      I fell in love with the artistic value of horror (although to me is not that scary...) after reading an illustrated Bible when I was an excitable pre-pubecent girl. I remember the images of Job in his torture, the faces of the people and animals struggling in the waters of the Deluge, the terror in the eyes of Lot's wife right before she turned into a pillar of salt... and I wondered, How can anyone find comfort in this barbaric madness?

      Then I looked deeper... and realized that the important thing portrayed in the Christian myths wasn't the pain, the horror or the mad agony oozing out each expression... But how those suffering reacted to their circumstances, and why they found themselves in them to begin with. After that, I wasn't scared of zombies, allegory about the walking dead or gore... For bodies without souls are just flesh, and they can't be half as terrifying (or as wonderful) as what my reaction to them can unleashed on the world around me. Yep, I'm a mad dreamer. ;-D ♥

      Delete
  14. I kind of got lost in the idea of gardening with corpses for a harvest of zombies--this is all the right weird, and brings a welcome dose of that Halloween spirit that lurks just around the corner of fall, where the winter darkness can turn your brain to mush--but nice to know it won;t go to waste! ;_)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Halloween in the the air, isn't it? I'm delighting in all the orange and sweet mysteries swimming around my mind. I can't wait to feel that energy that fills the world when The Veil is so thin that we can... well, you know. ;-)

      Delete
  15. Someone's antsy for Halloween! (Me too!)

    I love this line: "only The Sick Rose sprouts"

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yep! It starts right after mid August... and then everything is spooky yumminess. ;-D

      I've always thought that a "perfect" rose can only look forward to wilting, but for a "sick rose" the world offers all kinds of possibilities...

      Delete
  16. I like your kind of weird!

    ReplyDelete
  17. Oooooh - sprouting corpses! Delightfully weird, lol.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. They are holding cute daisies, too. I'm sure you noticed. ;-D

      Delete
  18. this was a succulent piece of uncanny brilliance! I took pleasure in its humor and mischief! applause!!!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I have many favorite words, James: Pliable, petrichor, bloom... but my first favorite words was "uncanny." I think I will always love it, so I get all warm inside when I see it used to describe something I've done. ;-)

      Delete
  19. The Sick Rose sprouts leapt out at me...I wonder why!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It's Blake; I'm sure. He has that effect in most of us... ;-)

      Delete
  20. I love your creepy little poems! You are so talented and delightfully odd!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You say the sweetest things!

      Delete
  21. Fits with a lot of the weird west stories I read.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You should share your reading list, Señor Meisner!

      Delete
  22. Corpses and sprouting! If only we could plant dead bodies and they'd grow into plants, or lord knows what?! I think that's a weirdly amazing concept. And extra Halloweeny!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Graveyard would be rainbows...

      Delete
  23. hahahaha. Very colourful! Might not sleep so good tonight though! hahahaa

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Poor you! I'm sure they would respect a brain as gifted as yours, not even a bit of mush there!

      Delete
  24. Weirdly excellent ;o) Big Hugs ;o)

    ReplyDelete
  25. 'Has the corpse started to sprout?' - Wonderful imagination. I don't usually like dark stuff, but this is dark and funny. Liked it :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I love how a bit of humor can usually help us see a bit farther...

      Delete
  26. Every "night out" should have its bit of horror.

    ReplyDelete