Awaiting Hungry Nibbles


“All plants are our brothers and sisters.
They talk to us and if we listen, we can hear them.”
~ Arapaho

In Spring,
I was rained with kisses
that left me wet and ready to bloom.
Now Summer’s heat teases my fruit and warms my core.
I am growing ripe for the picking,
awaiting hungry mouths
to nibble
and taste their fill of me.
My flesh sister told me, “My daughter
climbed out of my wet and dark, head first, and covered
in the richness of my inner-juice.”
I said, “My child feeds yours
for the Fall.”

for Imaginary Garden with Real Toads (Susie’s Bits Of Inspiration ~ Spirit Nature)

a Nature-full triquain swirl, which is created by joining the stanzas together on the seventh line, eliminating the second 3 syllable line and the space between stanzas. The finished stanza will stand at 13 lines and may be repeated thereafter.
3 - 6 - 9 - 12 - 9 - 6 - 3 - 6 - 9 - 12 - 9 - 6 - 3

Gaia Tree, by Jen Otey of MOONbow ARTworks

46 comments:

  1. Beautiful symbiosis of life.

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    1. I like your use of the word "symbiosis" to describe your taking of the tale. I like it a lot. ;-)

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  2. I don't understand the numbers...but I do LOVE the words <3
    XXX

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    1. I don't know all the background of the form, but you know I'll get hooked on anything that allows me to use thirteen lines. ;-D

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  3. I got such a mind picture of rich, ripe grapes. Wonderful words!

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    1. Plump, sexy grapes that drip juice down the chin when we eat them. I see them, too!

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  4. Oh, gorgeous! Love!

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  5. I love this! I love the turning of the seasons, the sense of ripeness and fulfilled potential and the subtle erotic symbolism (Well, not so much subtle...)

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    1. I'm not sure "subtle" and I have actually met. ;-D

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  6. So earthy, I can smell the soil and the birth. <3

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    1. You know what's curious? I thought of your art (your Grandmother Tree in particular) when I wrote this one. ♥

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  7. I read this as sweet flute music played, surrounding me, filling my soul. The combination.. exquisite.

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    1. If my words bring song to your melodious soul, my work is done and I'm all giggles. ;-)

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  8. Another fascinating form of poetry. Your words are like sweet notes growing louder, as they mingle within our souls.

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    1. I'm totally falling in love with the form. I should probably thank Kerry, from Imaginary Garden with Real Toads, again. I'm just loving these thirteen line opportunity. ;-)

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  9. Your words com alive with music from depth of ages....Marvelous! xx

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  10. Ah - well done. You brought together the unity - and juiciness - of all life.

    I was not aware of this form.

    Cheers!
    JzB

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    1. I wasn't aware either, but it was love at first read.

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  11. Oh how cool is this poem??!! I love it!

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    1. Love seems to be in the air. ;-)

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  12. Sensual and lovely, with a touch of foreboding in the final line -- love this very much!

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    1. When I first wrote the last line, I only saw the willingness of the speaker to give up her young for another. Then I reread it... and the tone and implications filled me with the "foreboding" you speak of. There is a promise in the statement. And a hint of threat, which leaked into the poem all by itself...

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  13. connected, maternal and erotic all in one!

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    1. Balance is the path towards happiness!

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  14. Amazing write...the expression of nature as it is meant to be...Thank you so much for taking part in the challenge!!

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    1. I love the balance your prompt brought to The Garden. It felt so good to birth something sweet, organic and exhaling Nature. So thank you!

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  15. There is such a deep, primal, paganness to motherhood and childbirth that so few people experience or understand. As a young woman who celebrates fertility in all its pain and pleasure I relish the idea that one day my body may create another human, nurture it, feed it. This piece reminded me of this amazing fact of life, of being a woman, of being able to choose whether or not I want to do that. Love!

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    1. I believe that if we put that witchy excitement and dedication into creating (birthing) each thing we do in life the results will be precious; if we love what we birth into the world, the energy our offspring (be it art or flesh) will bring joy to another. And that is indeed magical, methinks. May all our creations come out of the passion in our souls' loins. ♥

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  16. all the seasons make nature and nature makes us

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    1. And the Circle goes on and on and on...

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  17. This is just amazing poetry, Magaly! I am so happy to see the triquain put through its paces once more. Your language is so lush and interpretation of the quote is unique.

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    1. I love the visual structure of this form, Kerry. I also adore that it forces me to take my time with a poem--I often rush. But having to have a specific number of words and lines makes me think about the words, savor them a bit more careful... Yep, I'm in love. ;-)

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  18. One woman's kid is another's meal? (That is mean, but ??)
    I enjoyed the triquain swirl form. I had the middle mixed up, I was thinking it was "6" by joining the two "3's" together. But that would have made three sixes in a row. Yours worked very nicely.
    ..

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    1. One "being" child eats the offspring of another, indeed. We eat the lamb that eats that eats the clover... I'm sure the mother sheep mourns the absence of her young. Just like we would hurt if a lion devoured one of ours... But it's life--beautiful, brutal (and if we are lucky, also balanced).

      I had an extra syllable on my first attempt at a triquain swirl. I fixed it, and gave it another try. I think I'll continue to do so. I really like the form. ;-)

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  19. love this story of interdependence...how life continues....beautiful and the poem has a structural beauty...

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    1. Our world would be such a wonderful place if we all understood that we depend on everything around us... and vice versa.

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  20. This voice is its own proof, so beautifully does it acknowledge its part in life cycles, its interdependence and free choice to be Flow, sensually. Thank you.

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    1. Your interpretation fills me with warmth, Susan. ♥

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  21. Beautiful ;o) I love this ;o)

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