Fallen

our hearts heavy,
brimming liquid salty loss…
minding the Fallen

***
for Imaginary Garden with Real Toads, Open Monday Link

with my Dad

with Them

48 comments:

  1. The monument itself is so great! We shall remember those who fought for us, "Freedom is not free" as written on the website. True and sad.

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    1. "Freedom is not free" is one of those phrases that hurt so deeply, for we can count its veracity in the number of deaths it costs. Very sad, indeed...

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  2. what an interesting and allt he same sad place. The war Memorials here in Austria do look completely different. Only small marble crosses scattered across a lawn. I don't think there are even nameplates at some. Thank you for sharing!

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    1. Some of our cemeteries have very large sections dedicated to nameless graves. I think they are the saddest one because we remember them, but we don't really know who they were...

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    2. totally agree with you here

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  3. Thank you for this beautiful tribute to those who have served.

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    1. Thank you for taking the time to read it, Gail.

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  4. You say it all in so few lines -- and place it above so many memorials when you say it's more than remembering, it's "minding." Terrific images, too. Was your Dad a Marine? Where did he serve?

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    1. So glad you appreciate the weight of the word "minding" and how different it is from "remembering." The ladder is difficult and hard on the soul, but the former implies doing something, I think.

      My Dad wasn't a Marine, I was. That picture was taken the first time he visited me while I was stationed at the U. S. Marine Corps Casualty Section, in Quantico. He knew what I did before that day, but I always told him things like, "I assist the families of fallen services members." When he saw the numbers, when he understood that my whole day was spent reading about how Marines died (some of them former students of mine) he started crying. And I started crying for him. It was a day of discovery for both of us. I saw a side of my Dad's heart I had never seen before. I think the same was true for him.

      Thank you for asking.

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  5. A succinct tribute to those who've lost their lives for this country.

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  6. That must have been a sad visit for both you and your dad. Was he in for any combat time?
    I liked your poem about it, we all should remember.
    ..

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    1. My Dad was never in the armed forces. I was. I feel blessed that he never had to go to war. He has such a huge and sensitive heart--he isn't weak, but there are some things that I don't think he could have lived with... Does that make any sense? Hm, maybe some children just try their best to protect the parents they love from the ugly things, in an effort to keep them happy. Just like a boy who become lawyers in order to make his Dad's dream come true... ;-)

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  7. Great sacrifices should never be forgotten.

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  8. Loved your creative artwork...

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  9. So moving, Magaly. I wish you and all of my American neighbours a peaceful day of remembering and honouring your veterans.

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  10. so much said in so few words

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    1. Glad you found it to be so...

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  11. I love "minding the fallen" and the photos are striking - really arresting....beautifully done.

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    1. Thank you, Sherry Blue Sky--I love the imagery of your profile name, so I had to type it. :-)

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  12. I actually would love the backstory of the final image - likely ghostly images of those in your family lost to war? It is very haunting.

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    1. Someone else asked, so I've copied and pasted some of the answer for you. It was actually an accidental picture. Taken in front of the Wall of Remembrance--no blood relative of mine is there that I know of. At the time, I was still in the service and working for the U.S. Marine Corps Casualty Section. I took my Dad to see the Korean Memorial, and all the names and faces got to me. I started crying and I didn't want my Dad to notice so I got really close to the wall. The photographer saw my face after the flash made me turn around to look in his direction. I probably looked a little angry. He apologized and asked if I would like to keep the picture. I said yes, and apologized for snapping at him. I'm glad I did.

      I think the monument is so powerful that it touches all kinds of people... so many names, so many loss, so much hurt and fighting in the name of peace...

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  13. Thank you for your service, Magaly. My husband is retired Army and we are also mindful of the Fallen. It isn't just a Memorial Day thing, either. I understand what you were saying about your Dad. I've been with my husband 5 years and he is slowly letting me into his combat history. I pray for the day of no wars.

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    1. I join your prayer, Shelley...

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  14. Minding the Honored Dead is why I am infuriated when I read our gov't. preferred repatriating our soldiers at night, without cameras, to hide them from the media. If a battle is so unpopular, or wrong, that politicians find it necessary to hide our Dead......

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    1. This is such a tricky thing. In the past, repatriations were a huge public event as you already know--we welcome our heroes with hearts full of sorrow and prayers. Things have changed because of very ugly reasons. Groups--I won't even mention their names because they are disgusting--started to make trouble. Not just protesting against war, but doing things like spitting at the caskets. Sometimes I hope that there was enough security to bring our boys and girls back the way their sacrifice deserve, but the idea of someone spitting on a casket makes my blood boil. They should never be hidden. We should try to find a better way to protect their remains, and give them the honor they deserve.

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  15. Those dead--- such a story.. In Sweden we have been spared.. but wonder how long

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    1. Let's hope that it would last for a long, long, long time...

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  16. Those memorial statues are amazing and heartbreaking.
    My heart goes out to those who were lost and those who are left mourning their loved ones.

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  17. I don't find much to commemorate on memorial day. I mourn the dead every day. I mourn the innocent murdered in war, the survivors scarred by war, I mourn the children orphaned by war, I mourn for the innumerable, innevitabl rape victims, that come along with wars.

    I mourn the fact that we will go on making new dead soldiers year in and year out, not for the sake of liberty. Never for the sake of liberty. Always for the sake of rich men, ruling men, nation states, generals greedy for military promotions, and for war profiteers.

    I find it so hollow, so disingenuous to mourn these travesties only one day a year, knowing that we'll go on making more dead soldiers to mourn the next year.

    I am always mourning.

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    1. I think most of us hurt and mourn the loss of those who have fallen in the name of freedom. That is not something we can just stop, and they restarted on a special holiday. But just like we don't hold funerals that last forever, I believe that actively mourning each second of the day would be impossible for some of us. I wouldn't survive the soul pain. And if they gave their lives, so that I can live... well, you know, I think we should live a bit.

      To have a specific day to do something together doesn't feel like a travesty to me, but a tradition. We need coping mechanism... and this kind of remembrance offers that for some of us. The alternative would be unbearable, at least for me.

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  18. That's a very moving photograph of you, accident though it might be. It's as poignant as your words. Thank you, for taking us there. Thank you, for what you've given.

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    1. Some accidents are meant to be, methinks...

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  19. your father's eyes are sad. a fitting tribute ~

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    1. He was sad that day. We both were. There isn't a lot of smiling around that place...

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  20. thank you for your service.

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  21. Beautiful tribute <3 XXX

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  22. A beautiful tribute! I just read about how the last picture came to be. I agree, some accidents are meant to be ;o) Hugs ;o)

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    1. Accidents don't exist. Just events we didn't know where coming... ;-)

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