Real Gross Negligence and “Neglect”

One of my favorite quotes about fiction suggests that the former “explores topics which reality won’t even consider thinking about.”

Last Sunday, I wrote “Neglect,” a 128-words tale that I believe honors the spirit of the quote. Then my friend Gina shared an article on my Facebook wall, which reminded me that reality might avoid the discussion of certain difficult topics because the details it has to offer are often ghastlier than any fiction anyone can imagine.

If you haven’t read “Neglect,” please try doing so before reading the article. I wrote the story before knowing about the incident… And the connection between the two shook me. Seriously, my Wicked Luvs, this is a case where the direness within the fiction is almost mild when compared to the real life event.

via Wallpaper Likes

16 comments:

  1. It's horrific. And when I first learned about it, I wondered if it was some kind of undiagnosed post-natal psychosis. But no, she was a drunk. Just a drunk.

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    1. I wondered about mental illness, too. So disappointing, that a human being can sell her humanity (and the life of her child) to a high.

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  2. WOW, I can't stop the tears, or the pain in my chest.

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    1. It makes me wonder just how drunk one has to be to stop feeling...

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  3. Your amazing and disturbing fiction coupled with that horrific article is mirroring something that has been going through my mind the last few days. We've had a major criminal trial going on in Australia concerning the abduction and murder of a 13 year old boy called Daniel Morcombe back in 2003. He was abducted by a pedophile (who has been found guilty) while he was waiting for a bus to go shopping for Christmas presents for his family. Daniel's body was dumped in bushland and his remains were not found until 2011. His poor grieving family have suffered for years, first not knowing what happened, then having to go through the arrest and trial of the man who murdered their boy.

    I read Alice Seabold's novel, 'The Lovely Bones', several years ago and it really affected me. As I've been watching news reports about the Daniel Morcombe case, I've found myself thinking about the harrowing scenes in 'The Lovely Bones'. My long-winded point, is that the fiction made me explore a horrible reality in my mind, and when I hear the awful details of Daniel's last hours on this earth, I feel it more acutely, which is very uncomfortable, but it makes Daniel more than just another in a succession of terrible news stories. The fiction bred an even deeper level of empathy for the reality.

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    1. I've wonder about what happen to the child in "Neglect". How he or she ended up there and why. I know I will write more of the story because I need to know. The same happened with "Risqué". I thought I was done, but I'm not. I need to know what took that family to the place they ended up with.

      Fiction helps me explore real feelings. Like why the siblings, family members, neighbors and the mother failed to help that boy.

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  4. What an eerie coincidence, I do hope you write more of your story, I'd love to read on....

    Having just read the news report and Emma's comment above, I feel sickened at the thought of what some people are capable of.

    There is no justice for what they have forced others to endure. Such awful creatures (they don't deserve to be called people) should be forced to meet the same fate as their victims.

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    1. I will indeed. Like I said on my reply to Emma, I really want to know how the muse will make sense of this.

      We are always saying that people don't surprise us anymore. But I think that's a lie, things like this tend to surprise everyone...

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  5. Mag, this was unbelievable... It makes me wonder what drives someone to completely lose all sense.. The mental pain that takes over where they take it out on innocent people... That poor child!.. I wonder what he could of thought... I guess w/his age all he could think of was the pain and was not capable of reasoning...Its on the same level as the shooting(s) at Sandy Hook, Columbine, the 3 young girls who were captive in that house- now that man was clearly a goner...I read your story and omg- hth did I miss that post! You got my heart racing!

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    1. I was really spooked by it; wondering what level of alcohol-induced madness can push a person to forget their soul. Poor child, indeed. And we can just imagine the kind of damage she caused the rest of her children.

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  6. Can you imagine the psyches of the other children, living with the dying baby and then with the corpse? Every adult in their lives have failed them; parents, older siblings and authorities. What chance do they have at normal lives now?
    Ask me again why I don't want to bring children into this world.

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    1. Your questions and your worries send a chill into my bones.

      I know the house was a mess, but the smell had to be unbearable. The idea of what went through other children's head while the decay was taking place is enraging. I don't even want to think about that horrible woman. In a place very deep inside my heart, I want to think that the woman has some kind of undiagnosed disorder. But my brain tells me that some people are just that terrible.

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  7. I cry for these neglected children, there are so many who would love them, be kind and care for them... I sometimes wonder how these little ones are swallowed whole, nothing left but bones and a few clothes, it is not just this damaged person that did this, an uncaring society that doesn't want to get involved, ask questions, ring authorities, upset the obviously dysfunctional adults who are responsible for the innocent lives here.... As a society, all should take the blame if they knew or suspected and did nothing, it is too late, in this case 2 years too late, to shake heads and blame others, if a blind eye was turned when the opportunity to help was still an option.

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    1. It is a horrible thing done by caregivers. And I don't even know what to say about government agencies without starting to scream: they are always meddling in the the things they should stay out of, but when it comes to the stuff they should certainly pay attention to then they are absent. I know they can't fix everything, but it still pisses me off.

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  8. Horrific!! Terrible! My heart goes out to this poor child!

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    1. It is indeed. Poor babe... and I wonder what leads a parent to sink in a hole that terrible.

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