Dominican Thanksgiving? It’s Still Funny!

I’m grateful for humor and… for recycling (more on this at the end of the post).

Some time back, someone asked me, “How do Dominicans celebrate Thanksgiving?”

I grinned, and said, “You’re too funny.”

He gave me a bewildered look. 

My eyes opened as wide as his when a thought came to mind… I didn’t want to jump to any hasty conclusions, so I just asked. “Are you serious, or is this a trick question?”

“No… sorry I asked.” The sad look on his face almost made me feel bad. Then he opened his mouth again and the almost went poof. “It must be very upsetting not to be able to celebrate Thanksgiving. I knew the Dominican Republic was a poor country, but I didn’t know things were so horrible.”

I shook my head and prayed ignorance wasn’t contagious. I know that’s a terrible thing to say, but a thirty-something-year-old man who went to high school and college should have known why Dominicans don’t celebrate Thanksgiving, shouldn’t he?

I was tempted to say, I’m sure Dominicans would have come to the States to celebrate Thanksgiving, if the Pilgrims or the Native Americans would have sent an invitation; my people will go anywhere for free food. But don’t worry, we aren’t too sad about it, we understand the oceans were too dangerous then.

I didn’t say any of the above. I was overcome by the spirit of the season and decided to share my superior, um… 3rd grade knowledge. I explained that we didn’t celebrate Thanksgiving because the holiday is only celebrated in the US and Canada. We talked about the details of the harvest festivities and laughed. I also told him I was going to make fun of him on this post, but that he shouldn’t feel too bad. At least he wasn’t the man who sent “a message of support to Canada and its struggling national igloo.”

So today, I’m thankful to know people who are not too grand to laugh at their own silliness. I’m also thankful for third chances, love, AlmaMia Cienfuegos and a whole bunch of other things that would make this list way too long. Oh, and I am thankful for the miracle of post recycling—most of this entry was first published in 2009, but I still find it funny.

Happy Thanksgiving my, Wicked Darlings… everywhere ;-)

via

36 comments:

  1. Aww... I love the Turkinator! Haha. And feel slightly wrong for finding it so funny! ;)

    I've occasionally had encounters with people who assume that Australians celebrate Thanksgiving. :/

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    1. I don't think it's wrong at all. I find it freaking hilarious.

      I see Australia got no invitation to the party, either ;-D

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  2. A turkey with pecs? Good eating!

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    1. I wonder if there is a six pack under the feathers!

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  3. Ignorance is alive and full of bliss for some! ain't it?? lol....

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    1. It is indeed. And it comes to play during the holidays ;-D

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  4. I'm at a lose? :( xoDebi in the igloo in Canada

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    1. I hope global warming doesn't leave your dignitaries homeless. Or should that be office-less?

      I'm telling you, people are so ridiculous... and funny ;-)

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  5. Love the Turkinator! Lots of breast meat, yum!

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  6. I swear this is funnier because of my trip to the post office yesterday. Met some lovely people in line and one lady happened to be from the Dominican Republic. She and I got to talking and she asked where all the packages I was sending were going. I said Canada, Australia and the others were in the states, 12 in all. She asked if they were Christmas gifts and I said no. She said, "Oh how silly of me, that bag should have told me no to Christmas (my 3 phase moon goddess carry all). A man next to her said well then they must be Thanksgiving presents cause even .....wait for it....... native americans celebrate Thanksgiving. crickets. Sure dumb, dumb I would be sending out Thanksgiving presents, two days before and to Australia and carrying them in a pagan bag. And then he asked the lady that I had been talking to, "how she was going to celebrate Thanksgiving?" knowing she was Dominican. That's when I was called up to the counter. How many stupid things can one person say in a span of 2 minutes? Tee Hee

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    1. LOL! This is too funny!

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    2. "Thanksgiving presents, two days before and to Australia and carrying them in a pagan bag." Hahaha!

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  7. Ethnocentrism can be a particularly grating type of ignorance.

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    1. My Piano Man were getting some flower pots (to transplant our orange trees!). Anyway, a lady was arguing with one of the store helpers. I'm not sure what the argument was about, but the woman told the helper (who, by the way, had a West Indies accent), "In this country we believe in customer service."

      I wanted to tell her, "Yes, we do. We believe in manners and a tad less racism, too." But I was good. I just glared at her.

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  8. And I keep getting asked if the Brits celebrate 4th July... I have to say I like Thanksgiving. Speaking as a newcomer, it does seem to be a genuinely warm festival whose central theme is about feasting with family. No gifts, no dress code, lots of pie and stuffing. To explain it to someone from the UK, imagine you only have one Sunday Dinner a year and you have to pack all that cosiness and well-being (and most of the food) into one meal.

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    1. What do you mean you Brits don't celebrate the 4th of July!?! Plain lack of patriotism. If you tell me that you don't celebrate February 27th (Dominican Independence Day), I'm not sure where this relationship will go from here *hehehe!

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  9. I'm only here because your post mentioned free food...?

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  10. You'd be surprised just how many people really think Thanksgiving is a global phenomenon. Which is why I mentioned in my post about Thanksgiving that it really has lost all it's meaning over the years. I get bent out over it, still, but when it comes right down to it, it's been "Christmas-a-fied" and it's become something else entirely when you're shocked that other nations don't observe it.

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    1. Some people's children... Someone should teach them some history, and geography, and basic human decency... okay, I need to stop.

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  11. Everyone thinks we live in igloos! Have very Happy Thanksgiving ;o) xoxoxoxo

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    1. When I move to Canada, I'm getting a pink igloo ;-D

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    2. I'm moving in with you ;o)

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  12. Nice post. We also don't celebrate Thanksgiving in KZ. Still I need to read about that Thanksgiving-Turkey connection...it is sometimes weird...
    Igloo... it is good if people know what it is actually :)
    Happy day, Magaly! Hugs!

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    1. I think many turkeys will like to promote the "Thanksgiving-Turkey connection" being weird bit ;-D

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  13. Happy Thanksgiving!

    This post and the comments gave me my smiles for the day. Thank you.

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    1. I hope that smile lasts for many days ;-)

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  14. OMG Nena you are so funny Me encanta el sentido del humor Dominicano. Soy Boricua y creciendo en PuertoRico, recuerdo que mi familia decia "El Dia De El Pavo" y no "dia de accion de gracias" Porque mi madre era Independentista y my padre Socialista.

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    1. El dia del pavo... me has hecho pensar en mi hermanito. El siemper dicía, "Cocina costillitas en el dia del pavo."

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  15. LMAO! Oh honey, I had to have Dan come look at that cartoon. We are both still laughing.

    Now, regarding the Dominion Republic Thanksgiving discussion...wow...I don't even know what to say other than, bless his heart, which is usually Southern for...well, I'm sure you know. I hope you and your beautiful family have a wonderful Thanksgiving, my love. Mina

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    1. That is a very serious turkey. I didn't know what was better, the plate covering his skull or his pecs. Totally priceless!

      And people are very weird when it comes to most things out of their backyard. It's sad, really.

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  16. Oh, and Mike Huckabee and Canada's National Igloo? That's Arkansas's contribution to globalism. On behalf of my state, I humbly apologise.

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  17. I was actually thinking about this story a couple days ago, maybe when a coworker told me he doesn't celebrate Thanksgiving because he's English. Well, I'd thought he might possibly have family here who he might celebrate with...

    That comic at the end is priceless. You have no idea how I giggled. :)

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    1. Most of my family in the US celebrates Thanksgiving and 4th of July and other American holidays--they are here, after all. I think the problem arises when people view their own culture as the center of the world and believe that their cultural holidays are celebrated everywhere.

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