For a Moment of Silence

Gina Morley shared For a Moment of Silence sometime in January 2013. Today, the inspiration behind the painting came to mind while I read the following words in Home by Toni Morrison: “Fierce, unflinching, deeply compassionate… and rooted in traditional healing practices.”

My dear Gina, your art has soul… and flesh… and strong bones but you already knew that ;-)

Your thoughts, my Wicked Luvs?

23 comments:

  1. A never ending cycle. Birth & death intertwined as always.

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  2. I hadn't seen this work of Gina's but I love the gutsy story-telling aspect of that talented and creative babe (yep BIG fan) her canvases, her art, is meaty, never without layers, texture, thoughtful juxtaposition of real & fantasy, an extension of GINA in a take-away pack... I actually reckon GINA is a work of art herself, and it's always a pleasure to soak up her work... look at that baby... 2... are they aborted? Did the mother lose them by accident, death holds it with love, and another behind, is the mum disinterested or resigned to it's fate... UGGGH WHAT THE HELL... that bee, symbol of immortality??? Does that mean death was not the end??? OK brain going into overdrive, was it a genetic thing (?) the mother gives birth knowing death is part of life's cycle... but it screws with their head... Gina, get the hell over here & explain, this has freaked me out as much as your latest ghost hunt meeting up with the little soul trying to hold your hand!!! OK Cycle of life... Hakuna Matata... no worries... just a nightmare or two... did I say I love this???

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    1. Lol Shelle..I was thinking about the intense stress and exhaustion I was under as a new mum when I painted this, and there were a couple of miscarriages involved too. The Moth symbolised for me the moments of silence when my mind would wander, and I would worry if I was strong enough to resist the darker thoughts....."would death bring blessed silence and peace?"

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    2. Reading this exchange between you two, Shelle and Gina, made this witchy writer's day :-)

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    3. Gina, so relate to this... maybe that is why it awoke those feelings of stress & anxiety that constantly sit on my shoulders (lucky in the 80's it was easier to disguise with those Joan Collins shoulder pads) crap, yes I use jokes (usually pretty lame ones) to avoid the darker moments... but seriously, I don't think death would bring the peace, because those we leave would suffer so, and I don't like going all 'Annie' on this post BUT... well there is that awesome song 'Tomorrow, tomorrow...' but then that crappy downer by the Beatles 'Yesterday' and I totally got off track, but this dude (I think he was an alcoholic but awesome artist) and he said the problem with art now, is it is often decorative, because people buying art don't want confrontation, or to think, they want safe... which is fine, but, I don't think that's art, that's what wallpaper is for... So what I'm saying is you are an artist, and this painting speaks & worries & resolves in such an honest way it touched me, and thank you for sharing why x

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    4. I think, and my the universe, I'm not trying to speak for Gina, that the darkness evoked is more about accepting that it is okay to feel absolutely crappy about the things (people) who are the most important bits of our lives; it is human and should be acceptable, even if it isn't all that pretty. Kind of like when you tell a friend, "I could ring your neck for that!" but you don't really mean it, although the neck-ringing feelings are there.

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    5. Yep, the evoking is part of what makes magical art & BTW I think you actually have to be close to someone to admit you want to wring their necks!!!!
      and
      then...
      for them to accept that appreciate you anyways :)

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    6. Right on! I'm pretty sure that the ringing neck bit might be taken as a bit much by a stranger LOL

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  3. I am always thrilled and humbled by Gina's mastery of color texture.

    This magnificient piece took my mind to several places at once. too. Reading Gina's own comment to Shelle I see a retrospective of overwhelming new motherhood. But at last, it seems to me a silent reminder that we are all given over to death at the moment of our birth. And lest we long for the stillness of the long sleep, we must remember that spirits are a rowdy bunch.

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    1. What makes me love Gina's work so much is that it has the power to make the viewer appreciate the physical and emotional aspects of the art. I can't look at this work without a biological response... I've raised a child and I know the difficulties attached to that, the moments when you just want to scream, run away, and hide in a hole covering your ears to see if that way the babe will give a second of peace... but with her meaty pinks, purples, blacks... and raw textures, Gina makes me think of the pain my body never felt due to birthing... it makes me feel empathy for others. It makes me appreciate them more. Yep, she rocks.

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  4. This piece is very captivating. I looked and wondered what the story was behind it. Perhaps it is where my mind has been lately, but I felt the love of ancestors past, just weaving itself into the ordinary fabric of life. It takes no grand event, no miraculous effort - they are simply there, for the stressful, but all too normal moments of all our lives. I'd love to see a bigger version of this picture to admire the details in it. It feels much bigger than that small rectangle my browser shows me.

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    1. Gods! I love how we all can relate to this work. Gina is such a goddess ;-D

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  5. The word for me is "texture". It looks like something you can imagine the feel of. The weight of. It has layers and little crags. It makes me think of tribal art-carvings I saw a very long time ago. Very evocative and very well done. I'm not an Artist, so to see something that I can relate like this is a testament to how well it is done.

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    1. And that, my dear Narrator, is what I love most about art in general and about Gina's art in particular. I think most of us can see it ;-)

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  6. Gina, is a powerful, art, Goddess! I see two babies. I feel they aren't well, or maybe the mother isn't well? She is in deep thought, wondering if she will be there for her children? Will her children be ok, if she isn't there? Will she be ok, if her children die before her? So much emotion! Life, death, love, family.
    I just read the comments between Shelle and Gina!! Very powerful!
    Big Hugs ;o)

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    1. I've been delighting in the exchange between these two ladies, too. Isn't it wonderful? I feel like I'm listening in a life-changing conversation and no one really minds that I'm eavesdropping... which is rather cool ;-D

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    2. Do you think maybe one day we will all meet up in some old age home for crazy (but awesomely creative and outrageously fabulous) dudettes ;)

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    3. Shelle, I have no doubt! I can even see your colors and my words and the combo flying around us happily and giggling about the things the come out of our minds ;-)

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  7. This is a very strong painting.. I suppose many women would find the corresponding feelings in it. Gina, you are a great artist! Magaly, thanks for sharing her art.

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    1. I think "strong" is a great adjective to describe this painting. The texture grabs the neck, forces the eyes open, and squeezes the heart until emotions ooze out. Delicious!

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  8. You can tell right away this is powerful...this is meaningful stuff. The fact that parts are a little uncomfortable (skeletons holding babies) White eyed woman...not seeing, not hearing.....sparks emotion and a desire to either jump in and save or run away screaming :)

    Amazing any way you slice it!

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    1. It grabs you by the soul and it does not let you go...

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