Meacock

I have a blast making up dictionary games. I can spend hour after fun hour delighting in words and their meanings.

Today, I was playing with my 170-year-old dictionary, looking for archaic words that still feel good on my tongue, when I was surprised by the fact that my word buddy doesn’t include the word mayhap. The adverb has been around for quite a while, so I don’t get it.

I continued flipping back and forth between m-words… The definition of Morgue made me roar: “A place, in many towns in France, where the bodies of persons found dead are exposed, that they may be recognized by their friends.” 

Then I had to feel kind of sorry for Morkin, a guy who went to college with me. I just wonder how he feels about his parents naming him after a word that means “putrefied; [and] among hunters, a beast that has died by sickness or mischance.” 

The winner of today’s word game was Meacock. I had never seen the word before, and it’s meaning is offensive enough to suggest that I’ll never use it in a real conversation. But I’ve written a character (or three) who would be right at home telling another person that he or she is a mixture between “[meek and cock] An uxorious effeminate man.” Some of my fictional characters are mean to the bone, methinks.

Do you play with words, my Wicked Luvs? If so, would you care to share a bit of your game?    

20 comments:

  1. That is the best definition of morgue ever! I play with words a lot too. The most recent I actually saw in a Spanish dictionary and I looked it up online. Vicissitudes: "A change of circumstances or fortune, usually one that is unwelcomed."

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    1. I do love the word "vicissitudes," too. It's right there with serendipity ;-)

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  2. Love your antique dictionary! I have one from the 1700s, and I miss it. (It's in storage.) I love love love looking at words then and now, and seeing how they've changed. It's so reflective of much of society's evolution. I mix and match words all the time, and seeing you have a love for old books makes me think I must share a recent gift from a friend. A dump find!

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    1. You must share that baby when it's out of storage, and of course, I can't wait to see the recent gift!

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  3. I love mayhap too!! This was a post filled with awesome. As a word-lover, I totally relate!!

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    1. Mayhap, methinks, mixt... I adore them. They feel yummy ;-)

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  4. Wouldn't 'meterosexual' be close to 'meacock'? Have you 'liked' the FB page "Grandiloquent Word of the Day"?

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    1. I think "meterosexual" has to do with appearance and self-regard; a guy who takes care of his clothes, face, nails... in ways that have been attributed to certain women (I say "certain" because gods know I wouldn't go through the trouble). "Meacock" sounds sounds like it applies more to the way a man behaves towards his mate, methinks ;-D

      P.S. I just went and spent way too much time on Grandiloquent Word of the Day! I blame you, and I'm loving it *hehehe*

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  5. *is now looking up "uxorius" * :D ...hubby used to read me words from the dictionary to see if I knew the definition, you know like "bible bingo" where you flick the pages and shout stop, then guide their finger"left a bit ...right a bit..." I guess it could be listed as foreplay :D XXX

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    1. I'm grinning at the mention of "bible bingo" lol

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  6. ux·o·ri·ous [uhk-sawr-ee-uhs, -sohr-, uhg-zawr-, -zohr-] Show IPA
    adjective
    doting upon, foolishly fond of, or affectionately submissive toward one's wife.
    Origin:
    1590–1600; < Latin ūxōrius, equivalent to ūxor wife + -ius -ious

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    1. The bit about "foolishly fond of" is what I find offensive. I don't like the idea of others thinking that really liking, doting upon, openly loving... someone we care about (and who happens to be awesome) is foolish.

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  7. Yesterday my two translator colleagues and I spend (probably more than) our lunch break looking up the origin of weird German expressions such as "Potzblitz" (no definite origin so far -when you are surprised by something), "Ei der Daus" (referring to either games of dice or the devil, depending on source - if you hear or see something unexpected) or "Ach du grüne Neune" ("Green nine", probably referring to card games - if you hear something unexpected that is bad). The others both studied Germanistics and Anglistics, and I am just plain weird, so we usually have lots of fun with this kind of break.

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    1. "either games of dice or the devil" lol Aren't words just amazing. Yay, celebrate ambiguity!

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  8. I want to come to your house and play word games ;o) I'm happy Gina looked up uxorius. I didn't know the meaning either! Hugs ;o)

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    1. That would be a world of fun. NYC would shake and dance with our cackling ;-D

      I had to look up "uxorious," too!

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  9. Having such dictionary - I envy you, Magaly! Like in a good way. I would like to play with old words too. You know I was studying old Slavic language, so we had real fun sometimes at our lessons, picking up some funny sounding words, or words with the meaning, which changed in modern Russian. Though, can't recollect right now :)

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    1. That would be a blast indeed. I do that with Spanish and English--find words that mean something totally innocent in one language, but really naughty in the other. Fun, fun, fun ;-)

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  10. I love learning about the origin of words and phrases :)

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    1. Me too! Certain sayings have the most peculiar beginnings.

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