Dancing on Her Bones Is Finished, But…

I read and reread my third draft of AlmaMia’s novel, and something felt wrong… I’m not talking about that little bird that sings in every writer’s ear, tweeting, “It isn’t perfect yet. Revise some more. Kill a few darlings. Throw one last rock…” No, it was something else… so I continued reading and making wee revisions.

Then, the other day, I shared an excerpt of Dancing on Her Bones, and Kallan said AlmaMia “is growing up too fast, Mags. I’m not ready for her to be a teenager yet.” Those words showed me exactly what the problem was: The novel is not ready for AlmaMia the teenager, either.

She is nine-years-old in the short story. My current draft of the novel starts with a thirteen-year-old AlmaMia. At lot can (and does) happen in four years… especially after the way the introductory tale ends. Also, I used rather long flashbacks to clarify some of the shadows cast by the events that take place in the short story. They are necessary, but feel unnatural. I have more fun when I tell a story as it happens.

So… I’ve been rewriting the novel (I should probably say the true 1st novel), from the point of view of a much younger AlmaMia—she’s seven. Instead of flashbacks, I’m turning memories into current action; fleshing out the short story into the first part of the book, and going from there. The task is tedious and exciting (sometimes very slow), but I don’t mind the work. I will share my progress, in case you want to continue help *wink, wink*. Goodness knows that without Kallan’s reaction, I would probably be stuck still.  

And that, my Wicked Luvs, is the main reason why I share my writing process. When I think I’m stuck, you help me see that I am indeed in a bit of a jam… then you reach for me and help me out of the hole. My writing site is going to get very, um… writing-focused from this day forward—I hope not to bore you senseless. I don’t feel too bad, though; for there is always something fun, eclectic, witchy, and occasionally outrageous over at Pagan Culture ;-)

14 comments:

  1. Glad you found the right way now, the writing process is difficult, so you need to take time of course and let your characters feel alive, natural.i'm out of any really good comments today, so just wishing you a success with Dancing on Her Bones!

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    1. You'll never be out of great comments, my friend. One of the things I like most about your input is that they always add to the conversation ;-)

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  2. I love reading about your process. I do the reading, but haven't figured out the writing. I do know it's very hard work and I respect and am grateful to anyone who entertains me with this art.

    So...hope you'll let me review when it's finished. ;)

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    1. I find complete harmony in-between reading and writing.

      Let you review it? And here I was thinking I was going to have to ask ;-)

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  3. *sitting in the mango tree with AlmaMia,swinging our legs and waiting for new book* :D XXX

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    1. I can see the grin on her impish face ;-)

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  4. *SQUEE*!!! I get to have her grow up more slowly!! I am honored that my input was helpful, Mags. You know how much I love AlmaMia!! You, my dear, will NEVER be boring. That is a guarantee ;) <3

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    1. I'm the one who is honored to have wonderful minds who take the time to read, analyze the tale, and offer honest views. I know that I won't always be able to give every reader what he or she wants, but I love to do it when I can--particularly when it agrees with my own wants ;-)

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    2. I wish I could say I analyzed the tale and did that, but it was purely from my own love of the character and wanting to know every detail I can get about her life... lol

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    3. Well, love and curiosity works for me ;-D

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  5. You are never a bore ;o)

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    1. I will remember that. I might even make it a bit of a mantra ;-)

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  6. Anonymous2/04/2013

    As I visualize a little girl sitting in a mango tree, I am reminded about stories I once heard about ANOTHER little girl sitting in a mango tree long ago.

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    1. You can never be a secret spy. I can 'see' the over-excitable woods-loving blonde in every word ;-)

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