Witch Girls and Catholic Boys in Midsummer Nights

Midsummer Night is the second book in Erin O’Riordan’s Pagan Spirits Series. I enjoyed reading Beltane and was anxious to learn more about the lives of Allie and Zen. This book was as hot as the first, of course; the witchy sisters take sexuality to a whole new level, and then climb a few extra steps.

One detailed has stayed with me, and I wanted to see what you thought. Allie made a deal with her new husband. They baptized their young son and decided that “any boys they have will be Catholic, and any girls they have will be Pagans.”

The Pagan Spirits Series gives a great chance to anyone who likes to discuss interfaith relationships in a fictional setting, so I took the book to my reading group. We had a perfect 50/50 split when I asked my reading friends (6 women and 2 men): Should parents make this kind of spiritual decisions for their children?

I answered first, and suggested that it was wrong. I understand, and encourage, teaching children about eclectic spirituality and different religious systems, in a historical setting, but I just don’t know about choosing anyone’s—especially an ignorant child’s—spiritual path.

Erin O’Riordan’s writing is hot and thought provoking; such lovely combination, don’t you think?

Now, my Wicked Darlings, I ask you the same question: Should parents make spiritual decisions for their children? Care to explain? 

Visit Erin O’Riordan’s website to learn more about her writing, and of course, to get your hands on her Midsummer Night.

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21 comments:

  1. Diandra Linnemann8/17/2011

    Well, that's difficult... my parents had the deal that, since my Protestant mother was a SAHM, the children would be Protestant as well, so she could teach them. (You see where that ended: Two witches, two without religion *g*)

    I think it's only natural that parents bring up their children in the system they have chosen as best for themselves - this counts for ethical codes, everyday life and spirituality as well. But I think it is important to keep in mind that the children, eventually, will have to make their own choices. As a parent, you can offer choices and show how you do it, but at some point you will have to let your children decide for themselves. (Although, honestly, I would have a hard time raising Catholic or Muslim children... but if that will be what makes them happy... *sigh* - I still hope for tiny witches! ^^ )

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  2. Theredpixie8/17/2011

    NO WAY, like you I don't think it's right to make that choice for someone else, I am a mom of two boys and I think arming them with as much info as possible is the best thing to do, I am here as is Lee and family and friends in general to answer any questions they will have. They choose their own paths, yes Im their mom and I am here to teach them right from wrong but I am not here to dictate what their spiritual path should be, its too personal, its a journey that should be made by the person themselves once they are ready.
    They know momma's a witch and they know daddy very spiritual they know grandma is a heathen - well she says she is but she 's also very spiritual which kinda makes me giggle, they know that their aunite is a catholic and that their uncle is church of england, and they know that their other anutie and uncle don't really have a faith so I guess we cover alot of bases for future talks lol.
    This is a great thread hun, Im so glad I popped on over here this morning. Hope you are all happy and feeling the love xxx

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  3. I can almost hear their grandma saying "I'm a Heathen" and it makes me giggle too.

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  4. It is a difficult thing indeed. I think I would be inclined to teach more witchery than anything else, for it is what I love, but I would never tell them that is the way they need to go. I'm all for religion in a historical perspective until they can choose, if that is what they want for themselves.

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  5. Tamara Mesenbourg8/17/2011

    No I don't think that they should. When they are very young you should guide them but as they grow older, introduce to them to their options and let them decide what their own beliefs are.

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  6. Indeed; when they babes are little they should be allowed to be kids. We all know how difficult that can be, even without religion in the mix.

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  7. I think raising boys as Catholic and girls as Pagan is a recipe for disaster if you have a boy AND  a girl. The boy will grow up exposed to a church that teaches him things about women that conflict wildly with what a typical (?) Pagan upbringing is.

    It's a common practice to just expect your kids to do what you did, and there is something to be said for the communal experience. Even so, I wouldn't ask a child to commit to a spirituality, as I consider that choice one of the rites of passage and RIGHTS of passage into adulthood.

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  8. As I did not realize there was anything except christian when I had my kids (I know, very naive), I raised them very loosely christian...now I have a Pagan daughter and an extremely Christian son...they way they have raised their kids scares me...anyway, they will do what they want when they become adults...hopefully

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  9. MagicLoveCrow8/17/2011

    Even though we were brought up Catholic, my mom was very open minded. She always let us explore and she was always supportive. My mom is still this way! I love her ;o) And, none of us are Catholic now! LOL!

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  10. Shelly Chandler8/17/2011

    personally, i have do not make spiritual decisions for my daughter. when she was younger, i introduced her to various different religions and ways of thinking. i didn't go either way when she asked me what did i think. i answered all the questions that i could but, i left all of the thoughts and ideas to her.. for her to digest and think on. 

    she is 15 now. she is actually an atheist. 

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  11. Stefanie Ty8/18/2011

    I think that is a great question. As a Pagan and a Mom, I feel I'm caught in the cross-fires of religion and children. My Hubby was brought in a strict Catholic household and I was brought up in a sorta "only on the holidays" Catholic household. Although Hubby is still Catholic and I'm Pagan, we've agreed to raise our son with an understanding of both of our religions/Spiritualities and let him decide in the end what he wants to be. A good bit of our families have disagreed with our decision. They think I should put my Spirituality on the back burner completely and raise our son to be a Catholic and when he's all grown up, then I can teach him about my beliefs. I've politely told my family to piss off on that one. I don't believe in forcing religion on children, but I also don't believe it's right to hide it away from them either. A balance has to be found that allows you to explain your views and gives the child the freedom to find their own path to Divinity. Because at the end of it all, it boils down to the fact that the only connection to Deity they should be concerned with, is their own, regardless what anyone else thinks.

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  12. Secrecy, in this case, would not be good. I agree with you; children should be thought a bit of everything, particularly how to be critical thinkers. That way when the time comes they will have the tools they need to make an educated decision. 

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  13. She is becoming her own young woman. 

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  14. Your mom sounds like an intelligent and adorable woman, no wonder you turned out to be such a sweetie ;-)

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  15. I feel that way about some of my relatives and their children. A young relative was very upset a few years ago because I (who according to her mother know no god) will supposedly go to hell; the kid was about 5 or 6 then. Can you imagine living with such a burden at that age? Scary indeed...

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  16. What a terrifying thought: a young man believing his little sister is a violator of his godly law... scary indeed.

    I think spirituality is a lot like reading when it comes to teaching children: we tend to read them many things we like, but know variety is good, so we bring other things in. We should not be disappointed, if when the babes grow up, they decide our genre is not for them. We should just be proud they are good readers and better critical thinkers. 

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  17. Mina Crump8/18/2011

    I always taught my kids that all spirituality leads to the same destination. The difference is the path you choose to get there. They were exposed to my spirituality (earth witchy), hubby's (Native American Shamanism), my sister's (Buddhist Paganism) and my in-laws (Christian). We encouraged reading and research into everything in this area. So, my lovely wicked witch, my answer is no, I do not think parents should decide a child's path any more than they would decide upon a their mate.    

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  18. What a lovely eclectic mix!

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  19. Shelle Kennedy8/20/2011

    Great question but although I think it's great to pass on a spirituality to offspring it is up to them to take & interpret that in their life & everyday quests, they can mold  it & find an extra dimension to the material side, they can join it with other beliefs or reject & embrace something else... but I feel it is important to give it to them so they have all those opportunities.

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  20. I had a good friend who used to say, "We should share ourselves with our children and teach then what we believe is right from wrong, but we can't expect them to be us 'cause they'll always be them."

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  21. Angela Davis8/27/2011

    I don't know about saying I'd choose their spiritual path... I figured if I'd ever have kids I would raise them in a Pagan household. Their mother is Pagan, after all. Now, if I happened to have children with someone of a different religion, I would like to incorporate both of our religions, stating simply to one is "daddy's religion" and one is "mommy's religion." I want them to take part but if they grow up and make a clear decision that they are something else then that is perfectly fine. I wouldn't put pressure on them, in shorter terms.

    By the way, I love the new page!

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