Listening to Bachata Music, Is a Lot Like Having Sex

These dancers live at Beauty for Ashes 
The music genre known as Bachata was initially called Amargue, which in Spanish means bitterness. That was possibly true in the Dominican Republic of the early 1900s, when Bachata first reached the ears of the country of its origins. During those times the lyrics sang of Trujillo’s Regime—of the bitterness evoked by the dictator who oppressed and tortured the people he was supposed to lead and protect. It was the music of the countryfolk; field workers, sugar cane cutters, and of those with skins that were too dark to be good enough to exist in the same country of their governor. It was also the tune of clandestine lovers. Bachata was filled with a kind of human passion that offended the ears of Trujillo to the point that the genre was banned during his dictatorship. After the assassination of the tyrant, Bachata was still marginalized. The music was blasted in taverns and brothels, but played at a lower volume in the houses of people who probably didn’t believe it was as vulgar as their neighbors said. Things have changed; Bachata has evolved. Today, listening to this kind of music is a lot like having sex.

Bachata is no longer a forbidden rhythm exclusive to the Dominican Republic; guitars, bongos and güiras travel to North America, Europe and Asia in the company of Latin musicians who deliver art that moves the body and touches the soul. The latter might be to blame for the popularity of the genre. Bachata doesn’t only affect the ears; its lyrics are mostly in Spanish, but there is something contagious—almost liquid—about the rhythm guitar, which flows into the minds and bodies of many Bachata listeners, stimulating them to tap a foot, close their eyes, sway their hips, dismiss language barriers, and allow the sensual music to affect them physically and psychologically. Like in the case of sex, this genre can be best enjoyed when the listener allows it to work—simultaneously—the senses and the flesh.

The popular Latin rhythm calls for the abandonment of certain inhibitions: it is not impossible to listen to Bachata while holding on to hang-ups, but the experience can be awe-inspiring when the listener is not afraid of being startled by sudden musical outbursts. This is not to say that the music is unbalanced, on the contrary; it is so well-adjusted to its form that when the lyrics get passionate the instruments follow with notes that accentuate the meaning of the words. When the Bachata story speaks of betrayal, impossible loves, sexual need, intense anger and overwhelming happiness, the lead guitar screams, the second guitar follows through, the bongos shout sounds of passion, the güiras scratch with frustration… the entire band—people and instruments—comes together and assaults the listeners senses with living music. Bachata can be, at the same time, devastating to the self-conscious mind and ecstasy made song to the soul that welcomes the caresses of its tune without reservations.

Bachata is delightful when a person listens to it alone, but when its rhythm is shared with others, the result can be orgasmic. 

***
I rarely write about music. I dance, but I don’t play any instruments, so I’ve always felt I would do the topic no justice. Then I heard an unknown band singing “Piel Canella”, one of the songs in Little Latin Bar, but as a Bachata, and my luvs, I felt sexy, bold, and unstoppable. I had to share the above words with you.
 On a final note, the winner of Little Latin Bar from Paradise Music is…

I hope you are ready to get your dance on, my friend!
Send me your mailing info; again.

Share |

21 comments:

  1. A lot of people don't know this about me, but I love Bachata. Even though I can't understand the words, the music says everything. Ironically it reminds me of the happy times growing up in New Jersey where the city was predominantly Latino and so were all of my friends. I learned how to dance as well as I could (being white and growing up listening to 80's Hair Bands lol) and I loved it. I can't help but want to dance every time I hear the music. You made me smile today, Magaly. Hope you had a wonderful Lughnasadh.

    ReplyDelete
  2. I have never heard of Bachata!? Thanks for the info..I will have to partake and soon! Ha!
    Hugs
    SueAnn

    ReplyDelete
  3. I *love* Latin music. I have no idea what the lyrics are or what flavor it is, and my salsa-lating hips don't care. They'll move and sway to anything that has a beat. I'm going to have to look up Little Latin Bar. Thanks for the info. ;-)

    ReplyDelete
  4. I have three anti-sex bots and a husband who is always working. That is the reason I can't listen Bachata, and I do love it so much.

    ReplyDelete
  5. I don't recall ever hearing of Bachata before.

    Congrats to Lilac Wolf (and, great name... Lilac Wolf... Love it!)

    ReplyDelete
  6. I have never heard of Bachata? Thanks so much for sharing the history of it Magaly! Now I need to get some of that music and find me a man ;o) LOL! Congrats to Lilac Wolf ;o) Lucky girl!

    ReplyDelete
  7. I love Bachata! My Mexican son-in-law courted my daughter with his music. It's enchanting and magical...and yes, they are now married with two children. :D

    ReplyDelete
  8. A huge congratulations to Lilac!

    I don't know what stirs me more...your words or the music itself. Just reading your passion, love and soul for Bachata makes me want to not only listen to it but love it right along with you before I hear a note. I dance every chance I get. It makes me feel free and powerful, fluid and connected. Thank you for the introduction to such beautiful, strong rhythms, my wicked love. It is all you promised and then some. Hugs to you always, Mina

    ReplyDelete
  9. Music does something for the soul, doesn't it? It is so chemical and spiritual all at once that it hits a degree of intimacy that it can hardly be described; one needs to dance to feel it.

    ReplyDelete
  10. I've set my Pandora for Bachata music...nice..thanks

    ReplyDelete
  11. I have three anti-sex bots and a husband who is always working. That is the reason I can't listen Bachata, and I do love it so much.

    ReplyDelete
  12. I *love* Latin music. I have no idea what the lyrics are or what flavor it is, and my salsa-lating hips don't care. They'll move and sway to anything that has a beat. I'm going to have to look up Little Latin Bar. Thanks for the info. ;-)

    ReplyDelete
  13. A lot of people don't know this about me, but I love Bachata. Even though I can't understand the words, the music says everything. Ironically it reminds me of the happy times growing up in New Jersey where the city was predominantly Latino and so were all of my friends. I learned how to dance as well as I could (being white and growing up listening to 80's Hair Bands lol) and I loved it. I can't help but want to dance every time I hear the music. You made me smile today, Magaly. Hope you had a wonderful Lughnasadh.

    ReplyDelete
  14. What a great CD.  I desperately need a CD player in my house now.  I'm going to have to give the company a review, they were so wonderful.  When the CD arrvived, the case was smashed to bits *grin*, so I contacted Paradise Music and let them know, I told them not to complain but as a business owner I'd want to know.  They sent me another CD, Magical Nights, just for being kind and helpful.

    ReplyDelete
  15. lisa brawner12/31/2011

    Sounds like an interesting  collection of music...........i will see if our library carries any

    ReplyDelete
  16. They are amazing, indeed. I love their music, and their customer service keeps me coming back!

    ReplyDelete
  17. It's pretty lovely; in fact, I listened to it this morning ;-)

    ReplyDelete
  18. Magaly Alejandra Guerrero!!!!

    ReplyDelete